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dc.contributor.advisorJackson, L.T.B.
dc.contributor.authorMukondiwa, Steady
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-01T13:02:02Z
dc.date.available2013-10-01T13:02:02Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/9182
dc.descriptionThesis (MBA)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2013.
dc.description.abstractThe study was done to investigate the state of situational variables and how these variables affect work attitudes and subsequently intentions to quit in a manufacturing company in Gauteng Province. The study was carried out under normal business operating conditions without reinforcing any of the research variables within the period of the study. A stratified random sampling approach was used to carry out the study using a structured questionnaire developed from predictors used by other researchers. The questionnaire, based on a five-point Likert scale with situational variables such as learning and development, recognition, respect, appreciation, benefits and perks, salary, promotion, organisational support, perceived opportunity for rewards, fair leadership, organisational culture, working conditions, communication, trust and relationships and job security and work related attitudes such as organisational commitment, organisational citizenship, job satisfaction, job involvement, employee engagement and intentions to quit the organisation, was designed to capture the state of affairs within the organisation based on the employees’ percep tions of their experiences of these variables. Data was analysed using statistical analysis tools namely correlation and regression analysis. 200 questionnaires were issued and 111 were returned of which 103 were useable. The research data showed a moderate state of unhappiness with eight of the ten situational variables scoring below the midpoint signalling a need for the organisation to reinforce these variables. Work related attitudes were moderate and almost all scoring around the midpoint but intention to quit yielded a lower score. Correlations analysis showed statistically significant and strong positive relationships between situational work variables. Correlations also showed statistically significant medium to strong positive relationships between situational variables with work related attitudes. There was a statistically significant medium to strong negative relationship between intentions to quit and work related attitudes showing that as work attitudes improve intentions to quit decrease. The regression analyses showed that key situational work-related variables did predict work related attitudes and outcomes with perceived organisational support proving to be the most important predictor for all work related attitudes and outcomes; fair leadership were only a significant predictor for organisational citizenship behaviour and work engagement, while job security were only a significant predictor of job satisfaction, work engagement and intentions to quit. Organisational climate was also a significant predictor of organisational commitment, organisational citizenship and work engagement. Recommendations are provided for the organisation and for future research.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University
dc.subjectOrganisational commitmenten_US
dc.subjectorganisational citizenshipen_US
dc.subjectjob satisfactionen_US
dc.subjectjob involvementen_US
dc.subjectwork engagementen_US
dc.subjectintentions to quiten_US
dc.titleSituational variables and related work attitudes and outcomes in a manufacturing concern in the Gauteng Provinceen
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US


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