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dc.contributor.advisorMonyeki, M.A.
dc.contributor.advisorStrydom, G.L.
dc.contributor.authorTerblanche, Liandi.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-12T15:50:23Z
dc.date.available2013-02-12T15:50:23Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/8195
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Sc. (Biokinetics))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2012.
dc.description.abstractKnowledge of the salutogenic effects of exercise date back to the 9th century before Christ. Regular physical exercise has been viewed as an important component of a healthy lifestyle for years, while also successfully used as treatment modality for patients with chronic diseases in the later phases of rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to determine, by a systematic literature review, whether physical exercise is already being used during the hospital phase (acute phase) of certain medical conditions as treatment modality. If this were found to be the case, the study would determine for which conditions physical exercise is used and which discipline is responsible for it. Only research literature that refers to a structured exercise programme during the in–hospital phase will be analysed for the purpose of this study. The typical mobilization of in–hospital patients in support of medical procedures and/or prevention of negative results of bed rest, falls outside the focus of this study and will therefore not be published. All the studies found that adhere to the set criteria for this study, were analysed and presented in table form. The following data bases were consulted: NEXUS, Science Direct, Scopus, Highwire, Pubmed and Medline. Of the 17 studies researched in relation to physical exercise as treatment modality during the in–hospital phase, 7 indicate that physiotherapists are primarily responsible for the prescription of physical exercise for orthopaedic cases. During the in–hospital treatment of lifestyle related diseases and/or other chronic conditions, no clarity could be found concerning the specific medical discipline responsible for the recommendation of physical exercise as treatment modality. Therefore, from this study it can be concluded that physical exercise is indeed used as treatment modality during the in–hospital phase, however, no clear guidelines exist with regard to which disciplines enforce the exercise–prescription. This seems to differ globally from country to country. It is therefore clear that a void exists in literature that describes the role of different exercise therapists in the in–hospital phase, and that more research is needed in this field of study. There are also indications that different exercise therapists can work together in a multi–disciplinary team, during the in–hospital phase, to the patient’s advantage.en_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University
dc.subjectPhysical exercise
dc.subjectRehabilitation
dc.subjectChronic illnesses
dc.subjectEmotional conditions
dc.subjectOrthopaedic injuries
dc.subjectFisieke inoefening
dc.subjectRehabilitasie
dc.subjectKroniese siektes
dc.subjectEmosionele toestande
dc.subjectOrtopediese beserings
dc.titleFisieke oefening as behandelingsmodaliteit tydens die in–hospitaalfase : 'n sistematiese oorsigafr
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US
dc.contributor.researchID12621595 - Monyeki, Makama Andries (Supervisor)
dc.contributor.researchID10172521 - Strydom, Gert Lukas (Supervisor)


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