Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDu Plessis, Marthinus Lourens
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-25T06:20:48Z
dc.date.available2013-01-25T06:20:48Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationDu Plessis, M.L. 2010. Constitutional dialogue and the dialogic constitution (or: Constitutionalism as culture of dialogue). SA publiekreg/SA public law, 25(2):683-691. [http://www.unisa.ac.za/default.asp?Cmd=ViewContent&ContentID=24152]en_US
dc.identifier.issn0258-6568
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/7949
dc.description.abstractA constitution speaks. So my experience as theoretician of constitutional interpretation has taught me. Constitution-speak is not a monologue, not a monolithic soliloquy, with the supreme Constitution simply speaking for and on behalf of itself. Nor is it ventriloquial power-speak for and on behalf of powers that be. A Constitution's voice can, most clearly and credibly, be discerned in dialogue and, more precisely, in a virtually inestimable plurality of dialogic events in the life of a nation, but increasingly in our global experience too. I wish to identify and briefly describe some of these events, conceiving (with Peter Häberle) of the Constitution as an öffentlicher (ie open and public) Prozeß, and relying on a perception (and conception) of 'dialogue' capable of development and enrichment in dialogue with interdisciplinary and intercultural interlocutors.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUnisaen_US
dc.titleConstitutional dialogue and the dialogic constitution (or: Constitutionalism as culture of dialogue)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record