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dc.contributor.advisorStander, M.W.
dc.contributor.authorNqubane, Rirhandzu Milder
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-17T12:06:47Z
dc.date.available2009-02-17T12:06:47Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/686
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A. (Industrial Psychology))--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2008.en
dc.description.abstractOrganisations have been under enormous pressure due to the changes that they are constantly faced with. Most organisations have at some stage been involved in restructuring, laying-off of employees, and outsourcing of non-core business activities with the aim of coping with the change process. When organisations go through these changes, they still need to support their employees. They must ensure that the employees' roles are clarified, and that they feel secure in their jobs in order to improve their commitment to the organisation. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between perceived organisational support, role clarity, job insecurity and organisational commitment. Employees from a business unit in a petrochemical organisation were targeted for this research. The study population included employees from managerial, non-managerial and specialist categories. A cross-sectional design was used to achieve the research objectives. Measures of Perceived Organisational Support (POSQ), Role Clarity (RCQ), Job Insecurity (JIQ), Affective Organisational Commitment (OCQ) and a biographical questionnaire were administered for the study. The statistical analysis was carried out with the help of the SPSS program as well as the AMOS program. Pearson product-moment correlations indicated that when perceived organisational support increases, affective organisational commitment and role clarity will also increase. When perceived organisational support increases, role conflict and job insecurity will Vll decrease. Affective organisational commitment as well as role clarity is predicted by perceived organisational support. MANOYA analysis indicated that male employees experience higher levels of role conflict than their female counterparts. It seems that employees in first line management and professional categories experience significantly higher levels of perceived role conflict than employees in lower level positions. Employees in non-management positions experience significantly higher levels of affective job insecurity than employees in senior management positions. Employees in senior management positions experience significantly lower levels of cognitive job insecurity than employees in non-management positions. Recommendations were made for future research.en
dc.publisherNorth-West Universityen_US
dc.subjectPerceived Organisational Supporten
dc.subjectRole Clarityen
dc.subjectJob Insecurity and Organisational Commitmenten
dc.titleOrganisational support, role clarity, job insecurity and organisational commitment of employees in a petrochemical organisationen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.thesistypeMasters
dc.contributor.researchID10192425 - Stander, Marius Wilhelm (Supervisor)


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