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dc.contributor.advisorMasoga, M.
dc.contributor.authorRamoabi, Maisake Irene
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-19T12:00:32Z
dc.date.available2020-06-19T12:00:32Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/34817
dc.descriptionMA (Indigenous Knowledge Systems), North-West University, Mafikeng Campusen_US
dc.description.abstractThe overall objective of the study was to investigate and document the challenges women farmers face daily in dealing with climate change. They are expected to provide for families and to produce enough surplus for commercialization. The methods and strategies to deal with climate change are deeply rooted in grannies and young people around the world as these are communicated through the word of mouth and transmitted from generation to generation. The study therefore covered a broad spectrum of areas whereby indigenous knowledge was previous and is still presently utilized. In the past people had their own way of maintaining and controlling the little that they had to last them for the day, month, year and future. Different methods were implemented for the ultimate success of these practices. Food was prepared in such a way that it could not be pesticided. Incantations were performed for rain to fall. Knowledge preserved by our indigenous people enabled them to live longer and healthier in and around their environment. They were astrologically good in determining what the future could bring to them and they knew what, where and when to plough. Subsistence farming was mostly used for the sustainability of the family and food security for a long-term plan. Oxen were used to plough the fields and petlwana (hand-hoe) to plough in the small pieces of land. Girl child learnt all the tricks from their mothers as they worked hand in hand with them and still practised by others even today. By adhering to those practices our indigenous communities had been able to retain economic independence and self-sufficiency, and ensuring that the diversity of plant and animal species remain high. The availability of food in the household level depended on many variables such as production, land, labour, knowledge and technology, preservation and storage, forests, grasses and livestock. In-depth information previously gathered from the elders and by being part of the community was implemented. Visitation of several households as a participant was also taken into consideration. The study revealed that traditional agriculture is affordable as opposed to the high cost of modern agriculture. The study found that indigenous knowledge has lost its meaning, (others say (it is old fashioned) and is no longer used due to the alternative found in modern ways. There is still a lot to research on when comparing indigenous knowledge and modern techniques (Benneh, 2010). The vocality used to transmit indigenous knowledge made the world go round as things were done immediately instead of being sent to the labs for verification. Although the study did not focus on attitudes, it revealed that transmission from one generation to the next was a result of respect for parents and society, and adherence to strong values. Sustainability including conducive environment and Ubuntu were upheld to ensure food security through difficult climate change. Recommendations follow the findings.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University (South Africa)en_US
dc.titleIntegrating indigenous food security strategies into climate change mitigation among women in Morulengen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US
dc.contributor.researchID17134609 - Masoga, Mogomme Alpheus (Supervisor)


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