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dc.contributor.advisorVisagie, J.C.
dc.contributor.authorBain, Gillian
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-27T10:20:34Z
dc.date.available2018-07-27T10:20:34Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/30609
dc.identifier.urihttp://orcid.org/0000-0001-6610-0942
dc.descriptionMCom (Labour Relations Management), North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2018en_US
dc.description.abstractFrom previous literature, conflict handling styles, turnover intention and employability are critical focus areas of research in South Africa. Few studies have been directed to assess conflict handling styles regarding leadership, and the relationship thereof with employees’ turnover intention. Furthermore, little has been conducted concerning conflict handling styles regarding leadership and the influence thereof on an employee’s turnover intention and perceived employability. Thus, little is known about conflict handling style with regard to leadership and the influence that it has on employee’s decision to stay with an organisation and an employee’s perceived employability. Therefore, this study is aimed at (i) assessing the relationship between conflict handling styles regarding leadership and employees’ turnover intention and (ii) broadening the understanding of conflict handling style regarding organisational leadership and the influence thereof on employee turnover and perceived employability. A quantitative, cross-sectional research approach was followed containing a sample of n =118 from a leader in the banking sector in South Africa. Measuring instruments that were used included biographical information, The Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory-II (ROCI-II), Turnover Intention Scale of Bothma and Roodt (TIS-6) and the Employability Measure. SPSS and AMOS Version 24 were used together with the assistance of a statistician from North-West University. Descriptive Statistics, inferential statistics, SEM, CFA, ANOVA and T-Tests were used (de Vos et al., 2011). In Chapter 2 (Article 1) the objective was to determine the relationship between the constructs of conflict handling styles regarding leadership and turnover intention in an organisation. In this article, the results showed a correlation between the constructs, but it was not always positive, and that conflict handling style is not a predictor of turnover intention, as well as a structural model. In Chapter 3 (Article 2) the objective was to broaden the understanding of conflict handling style regarding organisational leadership and the influence thereof on employee turnover and perceived employability. In this article, the results indicated correlations between all three constructs that were both positive and negative. It was also confirmed that conflict handling styles are not a predictor of employability; a structural model was also indicateden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University (South Africa), Potchefstroom Campusen_US
dc.subjectConflict handlingen_US
dc.subjectTurnover intentionen_US
dc.subjectEmployabilityen_US
dc.subjectOrganisational leadershipen_US
dc.titleAssessing leadership's conflict handling style on an employee's turnover intention and employability in an organisationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US
dc.contributor.researchID10058818 - Visagie, Jan Christoffel (Supervisor)


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