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dc.contributor.authorFagbamigbe, Adeniyi Francis
dc.contributor.authorIdemudia, Erhabor Sunday
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-20T07:03:10Z
dc.date.available2018-06-20T07:03:10Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationFagbamigbe, A.F. & Idemudia, E.S. 2017. Wealth and antenatal care utilization in Nigeria: policy implications. Health Care For Women International, 38(1):17-37. [https://doi.org/10.1080/07399332.2016.1225743]
dc.identifier.issn0739–9332
dc.identifier.issn1096–4665 (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/07399332.2016.1225743
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/27825
dc.description.abstractAntenatal care (ANC) utilization is lower in Nigeria than the African average. We investigated the relationship between wealth and utilization of ANC and also assessed other determinants associated with ANC utilization in Nigeria. Using data of the most recent births within 5 years prior to a 2012 nationally representative survey, we modeled predictors of ANC utilization. Respondents in the wealthiest quintile were over five times (aOR = 5.5 (95% CI: 4.2-7.2) more likely to adequately use ANC. The odds of ANC use were generally lower among the poor and the least educated women living in rural areas who need ANC the most.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.titleWealth and antenatal care utilization in Nigeria: policy implications
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.researchID26725479 – Fagbamigbe, Adeniyi Francis
dc.contributor.researchID22337660 – Idemudia, Erhabor Sunday


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