Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKlopper, A
dc.contributor.authorVan Zyl, Susara Susanna
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-06T08:05:58Z
dc.date.available2017-07-06T08:05:58Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/25114
dc.descriptionMEd (Learner Support), North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2017en_US
dc.description.abstractThe ability to communicate (including speaking and listening) is an essential life skill for all learners, as it underpins a learner’s social, emotional and intellectual development. However, Grade R learners may not always be able to effectively understand and/or speak the language used at school for classroom instruction. This language used for classroom instruction is called the Language of Learning and Teaching (LoLT), and is of crucial importance to a learner’s success in many areas. The LoLT involves more than the ability to communicate in everyday conversational contexts, but is specifically related to the use of language for academic purposes. In South Africa, monolingualism is the exception rather than the norm (Olivier, Anthonissen, & Southwood, 2010). This poses several challenges to parents and teachers in selecting and using a LoLT in educational programmes (Olivier et al., 2010; South Africa, 2003). Even though mother-tongue education is seen as an educationally sound policy, the majority of South Africans prefer English and not their home language as LoLT (South Africa, 2003). A result of this choice is that many English Second Language (ESL) learners experience barriers to learning because of limited English proficiency. This may significantly delay or sometimes even permanently impede learners’ academic development (De Witt, Lessing, & Dicker, 1998). It is therefore important that learners can function in the LoLT if they are to master the skills necessary to proceed to the next level or Grade. When taking the above into consideration, a Grade R language programme which intends to incorporate oral proficiency, and specifically vocabulary enrichment, is essential. Meaningful vocabulary instruction should be facilitated, especially for learners from families where English proficiency is an issue (Hay & Fielding-Barnsley, 2007; Marvin & Wright, 1997; Schiff-Myers, Djukic, McGovern-Lawler, & Peres, 1993). The informal nature of the Grade R classroom assists in the promotion of oral proficiency and especially vocabulary enrichment through various learning activities. These learning activities include art-making, which may promote acquisition of vocabulary. During these activities, learners may be encouraged to express themselves and to communicate freely. The process of art-making itself helps to develop cognitive skills that aid in symbolic thinking (Camnizer, 2009; Read, 2008; Shumaker, 2009). Taking the above into consideration, it may be said that when young learners take part in art-marking activities, various senses are involved, as is the case with language activities. Participating in art-based lesson plans that incorporate language skills may appeal to various senses and learning styles, with the added possibility of enhancing oral proficiency (Read, 2008). In this study, various ways in which art-making can be utilised to promote oral proficiency, with specific reference to vocabulary enrichment, were investigateden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University (South Africa) , Potchefstroom Campusen_US
dc.subjectArt-makingen_US
dc.subjectGrade Ren_US
dc.subjectEnglish second languageen_US
dc.subjectVocabularyen_US
dc.subjectLanguage skillsen_US
dc.subjectOral proficiencyen_US
dc.titlePromoting oral proficiency through art-making in grade Ren_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record