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dc.contributor.advisorCoetzee, M.
dc.contributor.advisorPienaar, A.E.
dc.contributor.authorHöll, Tanya
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-30T11:49:36Z
dc.date.available2009-01-30T11:49:36Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/248
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A. (Human Movement Science))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2004.
dc.description.abstractMental retardation is a heterogeneous group of disorders with countless causes. It is characterised by cognitive and functional limitations in everyday skills, for example social skills, communication skills and motor skills and can be classified in behavioural, etiological and educational systems. Down's syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome are two of the many syndromes defined under mental retardation. The goal of this dissertation was to determine the effect of a water activity intervention programme on the motor proficiency levels of children with Down's syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. These aims were addressed by structuring the dissertation in five chapters: Chapter one constituting the introduction and statement of the problem, Chapter 2 presenting a review of relevant literature, Chapters 3 and 4 consisting of two research articles, addressing the specific aims of the study, and Chapter 5 including the summary, conclusions and recommendations. All the children who participated in the study were intuitionalized in a school for the mentally and physically handicapped. The MABC-test was used as the main evaluation instrument, and components of the Charlop-Atwell test were used to evaluate the coordination skills of the children with Down's syndrome. The first aim of this study was to determine the effect of a specially designed water activity intervention programme on the motor proficiency levels of children with Down's syndrome. Six children classified as having Down's syndrome, formed part of the research group. Their chronological age ranged between 9 and 14 years while their mental age classification was that of a 4 to 5 year old. The data was analysed by means Summary of descriptive statistics, and effect sizes were determined. The second aim of the study was to determine the effect of a water activity intervention programme on the motor proficiency levels of children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Six children participated in the programme. Their chronological age ranged between 7 and 17 years while their mental age classification was that of a 4 to 11 year old. Reporting the results were in the form of case studies, and effect sizes of differences were determined. With regard to the first aim of the study the results indicated that the motor proficiency levels of the experimental group with Down's syndrome improved, especially regarding the MABC-total, balance- and total body coordination skills. With reference to the second aim of the study, the results indicated that improvement in the motor proficiency levels of the children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome had a lasting effect. The MABC total, ball skills and manual dexterity were the components that showed the best improvement. It can be concluded that a water activity intervention programme is a suitable method for rectifying motor deficiencies among children with Down's syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Recommendations for the improvement of the water activity programme were presented, as well as suggestions for further studies.
dc.publisherNorth-West University
dc.subjectWater activityen
dc.subjectMovement ABCen
dc.subjectDCD (Development Coordination Disorder)en
dc.subjectFAS (Fetal Alcohol Syndrome)en
dc.subjectMotor developmenten
dc.subjectMental retardationen
dc.subjectMotor proficiencyen
dc.subjectDown's syndromeen
dc.subjectPhysical activityen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.titleThe effect of a water activity intervention programme on the motor proficiency levels of institutionalized children with Down's syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Syndromeen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.thesistypeMasters


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