Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWesterman, Christelle
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-10T08:14:47Z
dc.date.available2009-11-10T08:14:47Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/2458
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D. (Industrial Psychology))--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2006.en
dc.description.abstractThe information technology industry is considered to be one of the most demanding industries, with significant social, physical and psychological consequences for the wellbeing of the information technology professional. Work wellness and general psychological well-being plays an important role in the well-being of the information technology professional. The measurement of work-related wellness requires valid, reliable and culturally fair measuring instruments. However research on work wellness and occupational well-being in South Africa is lacking, especially in the information technology context. A lack of norms for work-related wellness in South Africa makes the identification of work-related wellness in the information technology industry difficult. Consequently, investigating the reliability, validity, equivalence and bias of work-related well-being measuring instruments would result in the standardisation of work wellness (consisting of burnout and engagement) and occupational well-being, suitable for use in the multicultural information technology industry setting. Moreover, the operationalisation of work wellness, as well as an inclusive model regarding the work-related wellness of information technology professionals that includes work wellness and occupational wellbeing are lacking in the South African literature. The objectives of this research were to standardise the measurement of work wellness for information technology professionals in South Africa, to develop and test a model of occupational well-being for information technology professionals in South Africa, to develop and test a comprehensive model of work-related wellness for information technology professionals in South Africa (consisting of work wellness and occupational well-being), and to test for moderating effects of affectivity in the experience of mark related well-being of information technology professionals in South Africa. The research consists of three separate articles, each consisting of a brief literature overview and an empirical study. A cross-sectional survey design with a snowball sample (n = 214) of information technology professionals in South Africa was used. Adapted versions of the Maslach Burnout Inventory - General Survey (MBI-GS) and Gtrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES), as well as the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Affectometer 2 (AFM-2), Life Orientation Test - Revised (LOT-R), Organisational Commitment Questionnaire (OC-Q), Information Technology Job Characteristics Inventory (ITJCI), as well as the Health scale of the Organisational Screening Evaluation Tool (ASSET) and a biographical questionnaire were used. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, correlations, exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used. Exploratory factor analysis confirmed a two-factor model for the MBI-GS consisting of a combined Burnout factor and Professional Efficacy, while a one-factor model was found for the UWES, namely Engagement, with acceptable internal consistencies. Exploratory second-order factor analysis confirmed a two-factor, culturally fair model of work wellness for information technology professionals in South Africa, consisting of burnout and work engagement. Item bias analysis revealed no evidence of bias for the MBI-GS, while uniform bias was found for two items (Items 7 and 12) of the UWES. Construct equivalence in terms of work wellness was obtained for the different language groups in the sample. The results confirmed a four-factor model of occupational well-being for information technology professionals in South Africa, namely negative and positive work wellness, organisational commitment and general psychological well-being. The model of occupational well-being was found to be equivalent across language groups, except for general psychological well-being, which seemed to differ for the non-mother-tongue English language speakers. In terms of work-related wellness, a model consisting of work wellness and occupational well-being was constructed and uccessfully tested. Structural equation analysis confirmed main effects for negative affectivity in terms of burnout and engagement, while main effects were confirmed for burnout, ill-health and engagement in terms of positive affectivity. Interaction effects for affectivity were not confirmed in the model of work-related wellness of information technology professionals in South Africa. Recommendations for the organisation and future research were made
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNorth-West Universityen_US
dc.subjectBurnouten
dc.subjectWork engagementen
dc.subjectPositive psychologyen
dc.subjectInformation technology professionalen
dc.subjectWork wellnessen
dc.subjectOccupational well-beingen
dc.subjectWork-related wellnessen
dc.subjectLife satisfactionen
dc.subjectAffectivityen
dc.subjectOptimismen
dc.subjectOrganisational commitmenten
dc.subjectJob characteristicsen
dc.subjectVarietyen
dc.subjectRelationship with supervisoren
dc.subjectRemunerationen
dc.subjectIndependenceen
dc.subjectJob resourcesen
dc.subjectJob demandsen
dc.subjectStainsen
dc.subjectReliabilityen
dc.subjectConstruct validityen
dc.subjectBiasen
dc.subjectEquivalenceen
dc.subjectModerator effectsen
dc.titleWork-related wellness of information technology professionals in South Africaen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.thesistypeDoctoral


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record