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dc.contributor.advisorSpies, B.M.
dc.contributor.advisorVan der Merwe, P.J.
dc.contributor.authorWeyer, Waldo Wilhelm
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-30T09:21:07Z
dc.date.available2009-01-30T09:21:07Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/237
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Mus.)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2004.
dc.description.abstractThe Concord Sonata by Charles Edward lves (1874-1954) concerns the musical representation of the writers R.W. Emerson, N. Hawthorne, Bronson and Louisa May Alcott, and H. Thoreau, who lived and worked in Concord, Massachusetts, during 1840-1860. The composer has set out a detailed programme for the sonata in his Essays before a sonata to inform the interpreter as to what his impression of these writers entails. This programme also presents philosophical ideas to be realized musically and two questions are subsequently raised: *How can the Essays assist the pianist to gain a better understanding of the programme? *What musical devices in the score can be associated with the programmatic ideas in the Essays? The aim of this study is to determine how the Essays before a sonata can enhance the performer's insight regarding the interpretation of the Concord Sonata. Ives' aesthetical ideas are linked with both the programme of the composition and the techniques used to realise it. The hypothesis holds that lves has mediated in his Essays before a sonata between an artistic and analytical approach to the Concord Sonata, especially where the abstract ideas of the programme are concerned. A model was developed to investigate lves' unique realization of the sonata form. In the course of the work he combined a cumulative structure and a crystallizing technique to issue in the most important theme. The "human-faith-melody" emerges fully in the third movement and becomes the transcendental tune in the last, played by a flute. Other musical devices incorporated in the model include lves' use of quotation, fragmentation, polistylistic writing, and the cyclic principle. His collage technique demonstrates the characteristics of the transcendental writers (i.e. quotation, reiteration, parody, aphorisms, rhetoric, a deep respect for and interest in nature, and an inherent heterogeneous style). This multi-dimensional writing constitutes a significant ambiguity that enables lves to communicate a philosophical message of the eminent and influential transcendental writers, which he revered.
dc.publisherNorth-West University
dc.titleDie interpretasie van Charles E. Ives se Concord Sonate volgens sy Essays before a sonataafr
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.thesistypeMasters


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