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dc.contributor.advisorGrainger, R.B.
dc.contributor.advisorDu Plooy, A.I.R.
dc.contributor.authorBishop, James Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-24T07:29:02Z
dc.date.available2016-06-24T07:29:02Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/17843
dc.descriptionPhD (Church Polity), North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractAuthority is legitimate, constructive, and moral. “For there is no authority except from God” (Rom: 13.10). Authoritarianism, however, is illegitimate, destructive, and immoral, with fear being an insidious inherent component. Any organization which is controlled by a single person tends to become authoritarian. Through its laws and prohibitions an authoritarian regime inflicts psychological abuse on its followers in opposition to the words of Jesus: “Their rulers lord it over them . . . but whoever wishes to become great among you must be your servant” (Mark: 10.42-43). To what extent, if any, does the Roman Catholic Church demonstrate authoritarianism? This thesis will explore this possibility by considering secrecy, infallibility, democracy, dissidence, sexuality, homophobia, misogyny, clericalism, the sensus fidelium, and pedophilia in the Catholic Church. Finally, this thesis will suggest, also, possible solutions to any observed defects.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectAuthoritarianismen_US
dc.subjectFearen_US
dc.subjectSexualityen_US
dc.subjectMisogynyen_US
dc.subjectHomophobiaen_US
dc.titleAuthoritarianism and fear as components of dysfunction in contemporary Catholicismen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeDoctoralen_US


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