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dc.contributor.advisorWenzel, M.J. Dr.
dc.contributor.authorCloete, Willem Hendrik
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-08T10:39:36Z
dc.date.available2016-06-08T10:39:36Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/17679
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A. (Applied Language and Literary Studies))--Potchefstroom University for Christian Higher Education, 2003.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe significance of "space" as a context (historical, geographical, etc.) in the creation of cultural identity and consciousness, its capacity to evoke cultural associations, and its importance as a context for cultural knowledge has been a predominant topic in recent scholarship. The translation of a construct of "cultural identity" such as Kringe in 'n Bos enhances and contributes towards the definition of a uniquely South African representation of time and space in the global context. When translation is studied as a product of its socio-historical context, the translator is faced with problems of ideology and cultural identity, which are addressed under the rubric of Landeskunde or realia in Translation Studies. Realia constitute a particular challenge to the translator because, according to the definition, precise equivalents of these words do not exist in other languages. This could cause shifts in the target language text. The concept of translatability is considered and it is concluded that an adequate and satisfactory German translation should nevertheless be achievable. Several translation theorists have devised models for the identification and categorisation of realia. On the basis of Dagut's division of the "Referential void" an adapted model is created for the identification of ostensible realia in Kringe in 'n Bos. The counterpart (parallel) markers of the forest ethos are subsequently traced in Unter dem Kalanderbaum and then compared in terms of accuracy and types of translation strategies employed. The question of translatability assumes an interesting dimension as the Afrikaans novel was translated into English by the author herself. The privileged position of author-translator granted Matthee a near-perfect understanding of the different layers of meaning and intention of the source text and eliminated the gap between the author and translator. It is established that the German version does not always adequately translate realia that inform the original Afrikaans version. One gets the impression that the German translator (Stege) resorted to transference as a strategy to avoid translation and it emerges that most instances of definite mistranslations are, indeed, attributable to Stege's unfamiliarity with the South African context.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectTranslationen_US
dc.subjectLiterary translationen_US
dc.subjectTranslation and intertextualityen_US
dc.subjectTranslatabilityen_US
dc.subjectSpace and identityen_US
dc.subjectLanguage differencesen_US
dc.subjectCultural translationen_US
dc.subjectLandeskundeen_US
dc.subjectRealiaen_US
dc.subjectExtra-textual elementsen_US
dc.subjectReferential voiden_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental voiden_US
dc.subjectCultural voiden_US
dc.subjectForest ethosen_US
dc.subjectAuthor-translatoren_US
dc.subjectDalene Mattheeen_US
dc.subjectGisela Stegeen_US
dc.subjectKringe in 'n Bosen_US
dc.subjectCircles in a Foresten_US
dc.subjectUnter dem Kalanderbaumen_US
dc.titleTranslating the "forest ethos" in Dalene Matthee's Kringe in 'n bos [Circles in a forest] with reference to Unter dem Kalanderbaumen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US


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