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dc.contributor.authorTarrant, Jeanne
dc.contributor.authorCilliers, Dirk
dc.contributor.authorDu Preez, Louis H
dc.contributor.authorWeldon, Ché
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-27T06:33:57Z
dc.date.available2016-01-27T06:33:57Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationTarrant, J. et al. 2013. Spatial assessment of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) in South Africa confirms endemic and widespread infection. PLoS ONE, 8(7):1-9. [http://www.plosone.org/]en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203 (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/16053
dc.description.abstractChytridiomycosis has been identified as a major cause of global amphibian declines. Despite widespread evidence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis infection in South African frogs, sampling for this disease has not focused on threatened species, or whether this pathogen poses a disease risk to these species. This study assessed the occurrence of Bd-infection in South African Red List species. In addition, all known records of infection from South Africa were used to model the ecological niche of Bd to provide a better understanding of spatial patterns and associated disease risk. Presence and prevalence of Bd was determined through quantitative real-time PCR of 360 skin swab samples from 17 threatened species from 38 sites across the country. Average prevalence was 14.8% for threatened species, with pathogen load varying considerably between species. MaxEnt was used to model the predicted distribution of Bd based on 683 positive records for South Africa. The resultant probability threshold map indicated that Bd is largely restricted to the wet eastern and coastal regions of South Africa. A lack of observed adverse impacts on wild threatened populations supports the endemic pathogen hypothesis for southern Africa. However, all threatened species occur within the limits of the predicted distribution for Bd, exposing them to potential Bd-associated risk factors. Predicting pathogen distribution patterns and potential impact is increasingly important for prioritising research and guiding management decisionsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Green Trust - Project number GT 1489. National Research Foundation, South Africaen_US
dc.description.urihttp://www.plosone.org/
dc.description.urihttp://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0069591
dc.description.uriDOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0069591
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.titleSpatial assessment of amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) in South Africa confirms endemic and widespread infectionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.researchID13077767 - Cilliers, Dirk Petrus
dc.contributor.researchID12308218 - Du Preez, Louis Heyns
dc.contributor.researchID12384488 - Weldon, Ché


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