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dc.contributor.authorDu Plessis, Emmerentia
dc.contributor.authorKoen, Magdalene P.
dc.contributor.authorBester, Petra
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-18T07:36:36Z
dc.date.available2015-11-18T07:36:36Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationDu Plessis, E. et al. 2013. Exploring home visits in a faith community as a service-learning opportunity. Nurse education today, 33:766-771. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2012.06.006]en_US
dc.identifier.issn0260-6917
dc.identifier.issn1532-2793 (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/15128
dc.description.abstractBackground: Within South Africa the Psychiatric Nursing Science curriculum in undergraduate Baccalaureate nursing education utilizes home visits as a service-learning opportunity. In this context faith communities are currently unexplored with regards to service-learning opportunities. With limited literature available on this topic, the question was raised as to what are these students' and family members' experience of home visits within a faith community. Purpose: To explore and describe nursing students' and family members' experiences of home visits within a faith community. Design: A qualitative approach was used that was phenomenological, explorative and descriptive and contextual in nature. Setting: The research was conducted within a faith community as service learning opportunity for Baccalaureate degree nursing students. This community was situated in a semi-urban area in the North-West Province, South Africa. Participants: Eighteen (n=18) final year nursing students from different cultural representations, grouped into seven groups conducted home visits at seven (n=7) families. Methods: Comprehensive reflective reporting after the visits, namely that the students participated in a World Café data collection technique and interviews were conducted with family members. Results: Three main themes emerged: students' initial experiences of feeling overwhelmed but later felt more competent; students' awareness of religious and cultural factors; and students' perception of their role. Two main themes from the family members emerged: experiencing caring and growth. Conclusions: There is mutual benefit for nursing students and family members. Students' experiences progress during home visits from feeling overwhelmed and incompetent towards a trusting relationship. Home visits in a faith community seems to be a valuable service learning opportunity, and the emotional competence, as well as spiritual and cultural awareness of nursing students should be facilitated in preparation for such home visits.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://www.journals.elsevier.com/nurse-education-today/
dc.description.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2012.06.006
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.subjectFamiliesen_US
dc.subjectfaith communityen_US
dc.subjecthome visitsen_US
dc.subjectnursing studentsen_US
dc.subjectservice-learningen_US
dc.subjectParish nursingen_US
dc.titleExploring home visits in a faith community as a service-learning opportunityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.researchID10962689 - Du Plessis, Emmerentia
dc.contributor.researchID10062211 - Koen, Magdalena Petronella
dc.contributor.researchID11311738 - Bester, Petra


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