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dc.contributor.authorVan der Westhuizen, Gerhardus
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-09T09:43:56Z
dc.date.available2014-09-09T09:43:56Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationVan Der Westhuizen, G. 2013. Bank productivity and sources of efficiency change: a case of the four largest banks in South Africa. International business and economics research journal, 12(2):127-138. [http://journals.cluteonline.com/index.php/IBER]en_US
dc.identifier.issn1535-0754
dc.identifier.issn2157-9393
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/11290
dc.description.abstractThe Malmquist productivity index was utilised to estimate the total factor productivity and productivity change of the four largest banks in South Africa for the period 1994 to 2010. Total factor productivity change can be decomposed into efficiency change and technological change, which allow for determining the sources of total factor productivity change. Various changes in the South African banking scene impacted on the average productivity of the banks. The four banks experienced, on average, regress in total factor productivity as well as regress in technological change, the latter indicating a lack of innovation. The four banks operated, on average, in the proximity of fully technical efficiency. For various reasons, South Africa still has a large ‘unbanked’ community.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://www.cluteinstitute.com/ojs/index.php/IBER/article/view/7625/7691
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherClute Institute [for academic research]en_US
dc.subjectTotal factor productivityen_US
dc.subjectMalmquist index
dc.subjectData envelopment analysis
dc.subjectTownship
dc.subjectBank performance
dc.subjectEfficiency change
dc.subjectTechnological change
dc.titleBank productivity and sources of efficiency change: a case of the four largest banks in South Africaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.researchID10055851 - Van der Westhuizen, Gerhardus


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