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dc.contributor.authorScott, Mechaéla
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-07T12:19:37Z
dc.date.available2014-04-07T12:19:37Z
dc.date.issued1991
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/10330
dc.descriptionProefskrif (DEd)--PU vir CHO, 1992
dc.description.abstractThis study was aimed at determining: (i) relationships among goal expectancy, self-efficacy, attributions and attributional dimensions, (ii) whether motivational patterns, and (iii) attributional styles, differ in accordance with conceptual levels of courses, and (iv) whether attributional style and self-efficacy influence academic achievement in courses differing in conceptual level. A literature study was undertaken to examine the nature of goals, attributions and self-efficacy, and their influence on learning and academic achievement. It was found that the approach to learning and motivation determines whatever influence the variables have. •with a product-oriented approach students .concentrate on learning content, and evaluate their performance according to academic achievement and social approval. A process-oriented approach, which is more conducive to learning, develops metacognitive skills, necessary for self-evaluation of learning performance. Through a Christian evaluation, the conclusion was reached that the process-oriented approach to motivation was acceptable, given that self-evaluation was based on a Christian anthropology. Perceptions of the locus, stability and control of attributions (i.e. attributional style or goal orientation) were found to influence motivation more than choice of attribution. Level of self-efficacy, however, mediates the influence of goal orientation on course type and academic achievement. Students with high self-efficacy choose challenging courses and persevere, whether they have learning or performance orientations. Students with low self-efficacy and performance orientations choose average-to-easy courses, to avoid unfavourable external evaluation and loss of self-esteem. A learning orientation is more positive than a performance orientation, as competence, and not academic achievement or social approval, is emphasised. With a process-oriented approach students thus learn cognitive and metacognitive skills necessary for self-evaluation, and develop a learning orientation. As perceptions of self-efficacy are based on competence, students become motivated to learn and choose challenging courses. Students enrolled for first-year courses in history and physical education (less conceptual courses) and mathematics and private law•(highly conceptual)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPotchefstroom University for Christian Higher Education
dc.titleGoals, attributions and self–efficacy as related to course choice and academic achievement of first–year university studentsen
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeDoctoralen_US


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