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dc.contributor.authorDiedericks, Melvin
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-29T08:43:31Z
dc.date.available2013-11-29T08:43:31Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/9647
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D. (Public Management and Governance))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2013.
dc.description.abstractThe recent reform of potable water service provisioning by means of the promulgation of the Water Services Act 108 of 1997 and the National Water Act 36 of 1998 in South Africa has started a process of addressing the imbalance that existed in regard to how the national resource was being distributed. Water is now recognised as a scarce resource that belongs to all the people of the country. Consequently, it should be managed in an integrated way for social and economic development – including future growth (Fuggle & Rabie, 2005:293; Reimann, Chimboza & Fubesi, 2012:446). What is required is an attitude that incorporates a sensitivity in the careful cognisance and management of ―the aggregate of surrounding objects, conditions, and influences that impact on the life and habits of man, or any other organism or collection of organisms (South Africa, 1989). The provision of potable water by water services authorities (WSAs) is an important basic service that faces a number of challenges, such as the use of an outdated infrastructure, the lack of skilled and knowledgeable people, improper planning, and the booming population that places overt pressure on the demand for service delivery. This study was, therefore, undertaken to investigate how a municipality – which is forced to obtain its potable water supply from nearby surface and groundwater catchments, could manage this supply in a more effective, efficient, equitable, economic and sustainable manner by means of improved co-operative governance and intergovernmental relations. The key motivation was thus to develop a plan that would manage water resources more effectively on strategic, tactical and operational levels within government structures and to assist in realising integrated water resources management (IWRM). The proposed plan could be used to develop a shared vision for the Dr Kenneth Kaunda District Municipality (Dr KKDM) municipal area of responsibility; and to provide an overview of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats regarding the management of water resources. A qualitative research design was used to conduct the study, which included a literature review, semi-structured interviews, data sampling and scientific analysis of responses. Furthermore, a case-study approach was followed by the researcher, with Dr KKDM as the unit of analysis (the locus).en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University
dc.subjectWateren_US
dc.subjectenvironmenten_US
dc.subjectwater resource managementen_US
dc.subjectresource managementen_US
dc.subjectplanningen_US
dc.subjectcoordinationen_US
dc.subjectpublic participationen_US
dc.subjectintegrated development planen_US
dc.subjectstrategyen_US
dc.subjectwater services development planen_US
dc.subjectlegislationen_US
dc.subjectregulationen_US
dc.titleA proposed water sector plan for the Dr Kenneth Kaunda District Municipalityen
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeDoctoralen_US


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