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dc.contributor.advisorWenzel, M.J.
dc.contributor.advisorDe Lange, A.M.
dc.contributor.authorSmit-Marais, Susanna Johanna
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-25T09:48:54Z
dc.date.available2013-07-25T09:48:54Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/8724
dc.descriptionThesis (PhD (English))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2013
dc.description.abstractGeneric transformation of the castaway novel is made evident by the various ways in which the narrative boundaries that separate fiction from reality and history, the past from the present, and the rational from the irrational, are reconfigured in Umberto Eco’s The Island of the Day Before (1994), J.M. Coetzee’s Foe (1986) and Yann Martel’s Life of Pi (2002). The dissolution of boundaries reflects the dominant shift that has occurred in the castaway novel from the 18th century literary context to the present postmodern, postcolonial context. In this regard, the narrative utilizes various narratological strategies, the most significant being intertextuality, metafiction, historiographical metafiction, allegory, irony, and the carnivalesque. These narratological strategies rewrite, revise, and recontextualize those generic conventions that perpetuated the culture of masculinity and conquest that defines colonialism and the traditional castaway novel epitomized by Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (1719). From a postcolonial perspective, the castaway’s state of being reflects on the condition of the colonized as well as the colonizer: his/her experience of displacement is similar to colonized peoples’ separation from their cultural, spiritual and personal identities; simultaneously, processes of appropriation, adaptation and control of space resemble colonization, thereby revealing the constructed nature of colonial space. As such, space is fundamental to individual orientation and social adaptation and consequently, metaphorically and metonymically linked to identity. In the selected postmodernist and postcolonial texts, the movement from the position of castaway to colonist as originally manifested in Robinson Crusoe is therefore reinterpreted and recontextualized. The postmodernist and postcolonial contexts resist fixed and one-dimensional representations of identity, as well as the appropriation and domination of space, that characterize shipwreck literature from pre-colonial and colonial periods. Rationalist notions of history, reality and truth as empirically definable concepts are also contested. The castaway identity is often characterized by feelings of physical and spiritual displacement and estrangement that can be paralleled to postmodernist themes of existential confusion and anxiety.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University
dc.subjectBoundariesen_US
dc.subjectCastawayen_US
dc.subjectColonialismen_US
dc.subjectFocalizationen_US
dc.subjectFoeen_US
dc.subjectGenreen_US
dc.subjectHybridityen_US
dc.subjectIdentityen_US
dc.subjectThe Island of the Day Beforeen_US
dc.subjectLife of Pien_US
dc.subjectLiminalityen_US
dc.subjectLiterary dominanten_US
dc.subjectNarrationen_US
dc.subjectNarratological strategiesen_US
dc.subjectPostcolonialismen_US
dc.subjectPostmodernismen_US
dc.subjectPost-postmodernismen_US
dc.subjectRobinson Crusoeen_US
dc.subjectSpace & Placeen_US
dc.subjectFokalisasieen_US
dc.subjectGrenseen_US
dc.subjectHibriditeiten_US
dc.subjectIdentiteiten_US
dc.subjectKolonialismeen_US
dc.subjectLiminaliteiten_US
dc.subjectLiterêre dominanten_US
dc.subjectNarratiefen_US
dc.subjectNarratologiese strategiëeen_US
dc.subjectPostkolonialismeen_US
dc.subjectPostmodernismeen_US
dc.subjectPost-postmodernismeen_US
dc.subjectRuimte & Pleken_US
dc.subjectSkipbreukelingen_US
dc.titleCastaways and colonists from Crusoe to Coetzeeen
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeDoctoralen_US
dc.contributor.researchID10055614 - Wenzel, Martha Jacomina (Supervisor)
dc.contributor.researchID10064354 - De Lange, Adriaan Michiel (Supervisor)


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