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dc.contributor.authorFreire, P.C.C.
dc.contributor.authorVenter, C.
dc.contributor.authorAbdo, A.A.
dc.contributor.authorAjello, M.
dc.contributor.authorAllafort, A.
dc.contributor.authorFermi LAT
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-11T06:52:23Z
dc.date.available2013-01-11T06:52:23Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.citationFreire, P.C.C. et al. 2011. Fermi detection of a luminous y-ray pulsar in a globular cluster. Science, 334(6059):1107-1110. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1207141 ]en_US
dc.identifier.issn0036-8075
dc.identifier.issn1095-9203 (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/7865
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1207141
dc.identifier.urihttp://science.sciencemag.org/content/334/6059/1107
dc.description.abstractWe report on the Fermi Large Area Telescope’s detection of γ-ray (>100 mega–electron volts) pulsations from pulsar J1823–3021A in the globular cluster NGC 6624 with high significance (∼7 σ). Its γ-ray luminosity, Lγ = (8.4 ± 1.6) × 1034 ergs per second, is the highest observed for any millisecond pulsar (MSP) to date, and it accounts for most of the cluster emission. The nondetection of the cluster in the off-pulse phase implies that it contains <32 γ-ray MSPs, not ∼100 as previously estimated. The γ-ray luminosity indicates that the unusually large rate of change of its period is caused by its intrinsic spin-down. This implies that J1823–3021A has the largest magnetic field and is the youngest MSP ever detected and that such anomalous objects might be forming at rates comparable to those of the more normal MSPs.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAAASen_US
dc.titleFermi detection of a luminous y-ray pulsar in a globular clusteren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.researchID12006653 - Venter, Christo


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