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dc.contributor.authorNota, Charles
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-08T09:56:21Z
dc.date.available2011-04-08T09:56:21Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/4099
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Mus.)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2010.
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is the documentation of an investigation aimed at identifying a model(s) that meets the needs of music educators in Zimbabwe. Although the government of Zimbabwe stipulates that music should be part of the education curriculum in the country, it has become evident that the majority of schools do not comply with this requirement. The failure to teach music effectively in schools has been attributed to a variety of factors. Among them are the non-availability of a clear policy on cultural arts education and the fact that music is not examined at the end of a [earning phase such as Grade 7. However, this dissertation argues that the identified problems can be addressed through a model of professional development in the form of an in-service training programme. In-service training models such as the individually-guided, collaborative problem-solving and action research models were identified. These models were interrogated in an effort to establish which one has the potential to address most effectively the anticipated pedagogical content knowledge for music educators in Zimbabwe. Among several models selected for discussion in this dissertation, the training model has been identified as the most appropriate one. It is comprised of five components, namely; theory, demonstration, practise, feedback and coaching. Competence training for teachers in a skills-based subject like music is believed to be incomplete. However, many educators view the training model as a cycle that rolls towards the attainment of specific goals, hence continuous and reflective interaction promotes effective skill acquisition. Relevant information was gathered through document analysis, interviews and focus group discussions. The findings revealed that the majority of music educators in Zimbabwe have limited knowledge of both music content and pedagogy. In addition, the analysis of the data also revealed that all educators possess a professional qualification of some kind, but there is a lack of specialisation in Music. Apparently, lack of human and physical resources in Zimbabwe has also been indicated as a factor impacting on the delivery of music education in the country. The failure to teach music effectively in schools has been attributed to a variety of factors. Among them are the non-availability of a clear policy on cultural arts education and the fact that music is not examined at the end of a [earning phase such as Grade 7. However, this dissertation argues that the identified problems can be addressed through a model of professional development in the form of an in-service training programme. In-service training models such as the individually-guided, collaborative problem-solving and action research models were identified. These models were interrogated in an effort to establish which one has the potential to address most effectively the anticipated pedagogical content knowledge for music educators in Zimbabwe. Among several models selected for discussion in this dissertation, the training model has been identified as the most appropriate one. It is comprised of five components, namely; theory, demonstration, practise, feedback and coaching. Competence training for teachers in a skills-based subject like music is believed to be incomplete. However, many educators view the training model as a cycle that rolls towards the attainment of specific goals, hence continuous and reflective interaction promotes effective skill acquisition. Relevant information was gathered through document analysis, interviews and focus group discussions. The findings revealed that the majority of music educators in Zimbabwe have limited knowledge of both music content and pedagogy. In addition, the analysis of the data also revealed that all educators possess a professional qualification of some kind, but there is a lack of specialisation in Music. Apparently, lack of human and physical resources in Zimbabwe has also been indicated as a factor impacting on the delivery of music education in the country.
dc.publisherNorth-West University
dc.titleIn-service training models for music educators in Zimbabween
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.thesistypeMasters


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