Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAlli, Shahnaz
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-10T13:51:42Z
dc.date.available2010-08-10T13:51:42Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/3636
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Com. (Human Resource Management))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2009.
dc.description.abstractThis project analyses the acculturation process in a specific context, in order to predict the perceived work success and health (both psychological and physical) of mineworkers in a mine in the North-West Province.1 Success is evaluated in terms of meeting deadlines at work, reputation and respect at work, and training and development opportunities at work. Employees' success and health is considered from an acculturation perspective and thus viewed as a result of the acculturation process. This hypothesis was investigated by examining the affect of the acculturation context and individual intervening factors, which are translated into variables, on perceived work success and health (acculturation outcomes). A random convenience sample of participants from the mine under investigated was taken (n = 288 the majority of the participants are male, married, Black, and Afrikaans-speaking). English questionnaires using a cross-sectional survey design were administered to these participants. The questions were derived from adapted measuring scales and scales developed for the project, which follow a five-point Likert format ('strongly agree' to 'strongly disagree'). Four categories of instruments were used: those examining the mainstream domain (multiculturalism, tolerance of other cultures by the mainstream, multicultural practices, relationships with host culture members at work), individual intervening factors (individual integration acculturation strategy and perceived self-efficacy), acculturation outcomes (health and work success), and the ethnocultural domain (ethnic integration demands, ethnic solidarity and social support, relationship with co-ethnics, and ethnic vitality at work). The data was captured in a spreadsheet, quality controlled, and statistically analysed using multivariate analysis of variance, one-way analysis of variance, and T-tests in SAS, SPSS, and AMOS (regression using structural equation modelling). Descriptive statistics, Cronbach alpha coefficients, and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients were examined. Effect sizes were used to determine the practical significance of the findings. Perceived self-efficacy is a statistically significant predictor of work success in terms of meeting deadlines. Multicultural practices, ethnic integration demands at work, relationship with co-ethnics individual integration acculturation strategy, and perceived self-efficacy statistically significant predictors of work success in terms of reputation and respect at work. Multicultural practices and ethnic solidarity and social support are statistically significant predictors of work success in terms of training and development opportunities at work. Relationships with host culture members at work, ethnic solidarity and social support, ethnic vitality at work, and individual integration acculturation strategy are statistically significant predictors of psychological health. Multiculturalism, multicultural practices, and tolerance of other cultures by the mainstream are statistically significant predictors of physical health. This project concludes that success and health can be considered from an acculturation perspective and these acculturation outcomes can be predicted based on the acculturation context and individual intervening factors.
dc.publisherNorth-West University
dc.subjectAcculturationen
dc.subjectAcculturation strategiesen
dc.subjectDominant and non-dominant groupsen
dc.subjectMulticulturalismen
dc.subjectIntegrationen
dc.subjectPsychological adaptationen
dc.subjectSociocultural adaptationen
dc.subjectWork successen
dc.subjectPhysical and psychological healthen
dc.titlePositive acculturation context variables as predictors of acculturation outcomes in a mine in the Nort-West Provinceen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.thesistypeMasters


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record