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dc.contributor.advisorOlivier, J A K
dc.contributor.advisorKotzé, H
dc.contributor.authorTheunissen, Annelise
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-10T14:26:34Z
dc.date.available2017-04-10T14:26:34Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/21309
dc.descriptionMA (Afrikaans en Nederlands), North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2016en_US
dc.description.abstractiii ABSTRACT The research field of language planning is regarded as the umbrella term for organised enterprises to find solutions to language problems (Baldauf, 2012:234, Fishman, 1973:79, New Mexico & Hult, 2010:75). Language planning takes place on four levels, namely status planning, corpus, languagein- education planning and prestige planning (Baldauf, 2012:234, Beukes, 2006:22, Kloss, 1968:69- 85, Shohamy, 2006:45). Shohamy (2006:49) defines language planning as the process by which it is determined what languages are used in what context, while a language policy is a set of principles that regulate language behaviour. The purpose of this study is to evaluate Aros' monolingual language policy in the context of South Africa's multilingual higher education landscape. The research design that was used to achieve this goal includes the exploratory sequential mixed method where a survey design was used. It was accompanied by a qualitative case study research approach, since this approach emphasized a specific phenomenon that was thoroughly studied. This research took place in an institutional environment and the aim was to evaluate the institution's mission, policies and goals. The research was done in two phases during which six qualitative focus group interviews were conducted. In the first phase, data from the focus groups was codified and divided into relevant themes. Phase one led to the development of the quantitative research tool that was used during phase two, where questionnaires were analysed and conclusions were made about the language requirements that existed among Aros students and staff. It was determined that several options exist on how language teaching can be offset within a multilingual environment. The researcher came to the conclusion that Afrikaans can only survive as university language in co-operation with other indigenous languages. The way in which Afrikaans co-exist with other indigenous language communities is, however, disputed by scholars. Finally, it was established that the language needs of Aros students and lecturers can be utilised through an implementation plan (in cooperation with Aros's language policy).en_US
dc.language.isootheren_US
dc.publisherNorth-West University (South Africa) , Potchefstroom Campusen_US
dc.subjectLanguage planningen_US
dc.subjectLanguage policyen_US
dc.subjectHigher educationen_US
dc.subjectMother tongueen_US
dc.subjectMultilingualismen_US
dc.subjectMonolingualismen_US
dc.subjectImplementationen_US
dc.subjectLanguage needsen_US
dc.titleTaalbeleid in privaat hoëronderwys : Aros as gevallestudieen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US


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