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dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Leon
dc.contributor.authorDu Preez, Louis
dc.contributor.authorVerneau, Olivier
dc.contributor.authorBonneau, Elodie
dc.contributor.authorHéritier, Laurent
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-19T07:31:00Z
dc.date.available2016-09-19T07:31:00Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationMeyer, L. et al. 2015. Parasite host-switching from the invasive American red-eared slider, Trachemys scripta elegans, to the native Mediterranean pond turtle, Mauremys leprosa, in natural environments. Aquatic invasions, 10(1):79–91. [http://www.aquaticinvasions.net/]en_US
dc.identifier.issn1798–6540
dc.identifier.issn1818–5487 (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/18819
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3391/ai.2015.10.1.08
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.aquaticinvasions.net/2015/AI_2015_Meyer_etal.pdf
dc.description.abstractThe red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans, is among the most over-exploited animals and is still exported annually from the USA all over the world. Once introduced into its new environment, feral populations may arise and pose threats to local biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. In France, it is in fact considered as a risk for the Mediterranean pond turtle, Mauremys leprosa, and the European pond turtle, Emys orbicularis, as they may compete for resources and habitat. Freshwater turtles are also host to a variety of parasites including protozoans and helminths. When introduced turtles escape, parasites may spread to native species. The objective of this study was to document the extent of platyhelminth invasions from T. s. elegans to natural M. leprosa populations in northern Spain and southern France and to evaluate the risks that parasite host-switching may pose on indigenous freshwater turtle species. From DNA barcoding analysis based on the sequencing of the Cytochrome c Oxidase I gene, the Bayesian tree and p-distance comparisons of closely related haplotypes revealed a greater polystome richness within M. leprosa than expected, suggesting that host switching may take place in natural environments. Because these parasites most typically infest American turtles like Chrysemys picta marginata and Graptemys pseudogeographica in their natural home range and because parasites were also found within T. s. elegans feral populations, it is suggested that the red-eared slider would serve as a carrier for a variety of not strictly host-specific polystomes that are transmitted to M. leprosa throughout the south of France. The global trade in freshwater turtles thus provides opportunity for parasites to be transported to new destinations which could impact the physiology, behavior and survival of native turtle speciesen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherRegional Euro-Asian Biological Invasions Centre (REABIC)en_US
dc.subjectPlatyhelminthesen_US
dc.subjectMonogeneaen_US
dc.subjecthost switchingen_US
dc.subjectparasite invasionen_US
dc.subjectturtle tradeen_US
dc.titleParasite host-switching from the invasive American red-eared slider, Trachemys scripta elegans, to the native Mediterranean pond turtle, Mauremys leprosa, in natural environmentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.researchID12308218 – Du Preez, Louis Heyns
dc.contributor.researchID13063227 – Meyer, Leon Nicolaas
dc.contributor.researchID25588427 – Verneau, Olivier


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