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dc.contributor.advisorBeukes, J.P.
dc.contributor.advisorVan Zyl, P.G.
dc.contributor.authorGlastonbury, Ralph Ivor
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-24T07:53:41Z
dc.date.available2015-11-24T07:53:41Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/15245
dc.descriptionMSc (Chemistry), North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2014en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Bushveld Igneous Complex (BIC) in South Africa holds approximately three quarters of the world’s viable chromite ore deposits. Most chromite is used for the production of ferrochromium (FeCr), which is a relatively crude alloy. Several chromite seams exist in the BIC. The most economically viable seams are the lower group 6 (LG6), the middle group 1 and 2 (MG1 and 2) and the upper group 2 (UG2) seams. The LG and MG seams are exploited specifically for their chromium content, whereas the UG2 seam is mainly exploited for platinum group minerals (PGM). However, the upgraded UG2 chromite in the PGM tailing is increasingly being used as a feedstock for FeCr production. Many different process variations exist for FeCr production. However, the process option applied in most green and brown field FeCr expansion projects during the last two decades in South Africa has been the oxidative sintered process (also referred to as the Outotec or Outokumpu process). Notwithstanding the common application of the oxidative sintered pelletised feed technology in the South African FeCr industry, and the increased utilisation of beneficiated UG2 ore, a direct comparison of the physical properties of oxidative sintered pellets produced from UG2 with the physical properties of that produced with conventional metallurgical grade chromite ore is currently lacking in the peer-reviewed scientific literature. Therefore, the physical properties of oxidative sintered pellets produced from a typical beneficiated South African UG2 ore were compared with the physical properties of that produced with conventional South African metallurgical grade chromite ore in this study. The results indicated that the case study metallurgical grade chromite ore required 13 kWh/t more energy to mill than the case study UG2 ore prior to pelletisation, which can lead to substantial cost savings. The compressive strength of the oxidative sintered pellets of both case study ores statistically showed that oxidative sintered pellets made from UG2 ore were the same or better than those prepared from metallurgical grade chromite ore. A comparison of the abrasion strengths of the oxidative sintered pellets of both case study ores indicated that the pellets prepared from UG2 ore were superior compared to the metallurgical grade pellets. The reasons for the superior UG2 pellet strength were investigated with backscatter-, secondary electron- and elemental X-ray mapping scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which indicated that differences in crystalline structures at least partially contributed to the differences observed. Results presented here can be utilised by FeCr producers to better quantify the advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of UG2 ore for FeCr production.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_US
dc.subjectUG2 and metallurgical grade chromiteen_US
dc.subjectOxidative sintered pelletsen_US
dc.subjectCompressive and abrasion strengthsen_US
dc.subjectMilling energy requirementsen_US
dc.titleComparison of physical properties of oxidative sintered pellets produced with UG2 or metallurgical grade South African chromite : a case studyen
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US
dc.contributor.researchID10710361 - Van Zyl, Pieter Gideon (Supervisor)
dc.contributor.researchID10092390 - Beukes, Johan Paul (Supervisor)


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