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dc.contributor.advisorEls, C.
dc.contributor.authorWelthagen, Christa
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-14T09:09:51Z
dc.date.available2014-08-14T09:09:51Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/11100
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Com. (Industrial Psychology))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2011en_US
dc.description.abstractDepression is one of the most debilitating, widespread and costly health problems worldwide and has a high prevalence in almost every society. Research suggests that depression affects an individual's work engagement levels, burnout levels and the occurrence of stress-related ill health symptoms. However, it is unclear whether these findings would differ among individuals who reported that they suffer from depression and receive medical treatment for it, individuals who reported that they are unsure whether they suffer from depression, and individuals who reported that they do not suffer from depression. This study is quantitative in nature and a cross-sectional design was used. The study population consisted of 15 664 participants from several sectors in South Africa. The participants also differed in terms of gender, age, race, marital status, educational level, language and the province where they reside. The sample population was thus representative of the diverse population of South Africa. The SAEHWS, a self-report instrument based on the dual-process model of work-related well-being, was used to measure all constructs. The participants were divided into three groups, i.e. individuals who reported that they suffer from depression and are currently receiving medical treatment for depression, individuals who reported that they are uncertain whether they suffer from depression, and individuals who reported that they do not suffer from depression. Frequencies were used to determine the prevalence of depression in the three different groups and MANOVA (multivariate analysis of variance) was used to determine the significance of differences between the levels of work engagement, burnout and stress-related ill health symptoms of the three different groups (individuals who reported that they suffer from depression, individuals who reported that they are uncertain whether they suffer from depression, and those who reported that they do not suffer from depression). The results showed that 18,3% of the population reported that they suffer from depression and receive medical treatment for depression, 16,7% of the population reported that they are unsure whether they suffer from depression and 65% reported that they do not suffer from depression. Furthermore, it was found that depression significantly influences work engagement levels negatively and that it significantly influences burnout levels and the occurrence of stress-related ill health symptoms positively. This study will make organisations aware of the effect of depression on an individual's well-being and of the fact that depression is a factor to be reckoned with. Employers should consider ways to assist employees who suffer from depression and should learn how to act preventatively to decrease any further occurrence.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectDepressionen_US
dc.subjectWork engagementen_US
dc.subjectBurnouten_US
dc.subjectStress-related ill healthen_US
dc.subjectStress-related psychological ill healthen_US
dc.subjectStress-related physical ill healthen_US
dc.subjectVigouren_US
dc.subjectDedicationen_US
dc.subjectExhaustionen_US
dc.subjectCynicismen_US
dc.subjectDepressieen_US
dc.subjectWerksbegeesteringen_US
dc.subjectUitbrandingen_US
dc.subjectStresverwante swak gesondheiden_US
dc.subjectStresverwante psigologiese swak gesondheiden_US
dc.subjectStresverwante fisiese swak gesondheiden_US
dc.subjectLewenskragtigheiden_US
dc.subjectWerkstoewydingen_US
dc.subjectUitputtingen_US
dc.subjectAfsydigheiden_US
dc.titleDepressed, not depressed or unsure : prevalence and the relation to well–being across sectors in South Africaen
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US


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