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dc.contributor.advisorKruger, J-L.
dc.contributor.authorWilken, Nicola-Mari
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-26T06:04:14Z
dc.date.available2014-02-26T06:04:14Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10394/10110
dc.descriptionThesis (MA (Language Practice))--North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, 2013en
dc.description.abstractAudio description is considered a relatively new research field, and in South Africa it is not yet being used extensively to make visual channels accessible to blind audiences. Therefore research in this field is necessary. The literature review of this study shows that very little empirical research has been done where real audiences were tested. This study set out to test the impact of audio described film on the transportation, identification and comprehension of real audiences. The focus was on mise-en-shot elements specifically and the impact they have on the transportation, identification and comprehension of audiences. A thorough analysis of the two scenes and their audio descriptions showed that in the audio description the emphasis tends to be on the visual elements and not on the way these elements are presented (which forms part of mise-en-shot elements). The way the film is showed to the audience contributes to the film‟s meaning and the director often shows the film to the audience in a specific way to reach a certain effect or feeling in the film. If these mise-en-shot elements are not presented in the audio description of the film it, the blind audience cannot be expected to experience an equivalent effect to that of the sighted audience. In order to test the impact of mise-en-shot elements a methodology based on Bortolussi and Dixon‟s (2010) Psyconarratology was used. Immersion and transportation studies (Green and Brock, 2000 and Tal-Or & Cohen, 2010) were used to develop an experiment for the study. Two groups of respondents were tested by exposing one group to all the available channels of the film and another to only the audio description and soundtrack. The initial hypothesis of this study was that the audience exposed to the audio description and soundtrack of the film would experience less transportation, identification and comprehension due to the loss of mise-en-shot elements in the film. By using T-tests and qualitative comparisons of the responses it was found that the lack of mise-en-shot elements in the film had no statistically significant impact on the transportation of the audience. Furthermore it was found that the lack of mise-en-shot elements has an impact on the identification of the audience. The group that had access to all the channels were more able to identify with the characters. In terms of comprehension it was discovered that there were bigger differences between the two groups in the scenes were the director relied on the visual elements of the film. Thus there are opportunities for further research pertaining to the identification of the audience. Furthermore it is recommended that further research be done to include other film genres as well as alternative ways of doing audio description. South Africa as well as other countries can gain tremendously from the use of audio description to make visual channels accessible to blind audiences. To reach such a goal further research is needed in the field, not only to master the art of audio describing but to also create awareness for this aid.en_US
dc.language.isootheren_US
dc.publisherNorth-West Universityen_US
dc.subjectAudio descriptionen_US
dc.subjectTransportationen_US
dc.subjectIdentificationen_US
dc.subjectComprehensionen_US
dc.subjectMise-en-scèneen_US
dc.subjectMise-en-shoten_US
dc.subjectFilmen_US
dc.titleDie impak van mise–en–shot op die interpretasie van oudiobeskryfde filmafr
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.thesistypeMastersen_US
dc.contributor.researchID10072578 - Kruger, Jan-Louis (Supervisor)


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